Blogs list

Lara Bender - Titus - Lara Bender

Does My Organization Really Need a Separate Data Classification Solution? - Sponsored Article Last month, I attended the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit, where data classification was covered in many of the Gartner and vendor-led presentations. A key change over the last few years is that classification is now being discussed as part of an overall data security strategy, rather than as a separate project suitable for only certain use cases or industries. As data classification has become more mainstream, we’ve seen an increasing number of security and cloud vendors adding classification to their product portfolios. This is good news for those of us who believe in the importance of data classification as a foundation for data security.  So if classification is built into so many solutions, why do organizations continue to look at separate data classification solutions for their organization? Here’s why: Industry focus: Organizations are looking for solutions and services that meet the more tailored requirements of their industry. This covers everything from truly understanding the organization’s business challenges to being able to customize the solution to the organization’s use cases and environment. Customer experience: Data classification is a highly visible and impactful technology that requires careful planning for success. Many organizations want focused expertise from an organization that can offer such things as classification schema and policy development assistance, a detailed deployment methodology, and classification-focused support resources. This kind of assistance is more difficult to obtain when classification is just a small feature in a larger solution bundle. Breadth of coverage: Organizations need to identify and protect data wherever it resides –…

Photo : Lara Bender August 05, 2016

Bergen Wilde - Titus - Bergen Wilde

Classification as the Foundation for Information Lifecycle Management - Sponsored Article I was first introduced to information lifecycle management about 15 years ago when I was a sales rep for an SAP consulting company. Because SAP generates huge volumes of data that eventually clogs up the system, we helped companies archive the old data into offline document management systems for easy location and retrieval if/when needed. As I learned more about document management systems, I expanded my focus from just archiving solutions to complete content management solutions that would control the lifecycle of corporate documents – from creation, through revisions, approvals, archiving and eventual destruction. Document management solutions were meant to simplify this process – and they do – but they have never been able to capture all the unstructured data being shared both around the office and between organizations. As the cloud and mobile work world explodes, ensuring that all corporate records are input into the content repository becomes a greater challenge. Good information governance requires that all corporate records are properly managed, especially those that reside outside the content management solution (if only temporarily). Given that, another solution is needed. Data classification provides many of the tools necessary to properly govern information wherever it resides. Identification of data should begin immediately when the file is created to ensure the identity is not lost when the file is shared or moved. Identifying attributes, such as the classification, can be applied as persistent classification metadata. By embedding the identity as persistent metadata, users, security policies, and records management systems will have instructions on how…

Photo : Bergen Wilde July 11, 2016

Susan Wright - The Hillbrooke Group - Susan Wright

The Pitch Gets Harder - Sponsored Article You may think that your business or organization has a blockbuster story to tell, but try getting past the assignment editor of most Canadian media outlets these days. In the ‘good old days’, most of us in the communications business set aside time and resources to pitch stories to media about breaking stories, big events and milestones. Today, you’ll be lucky to find an editor or producer at their desk and they will be hard pressed to find someone to assign the story to. Newsrooms across the country have been gutted and countless papers have stopped publishing their print editions. Corporate mergers meant to ease the financial strain have, in fact, just added organizational chaos to the mix. Pay walls discourage open readership. Advertisers are less convinced that they are reaching their audiences. And there is nary a beat reporter to be found. Many of Canada’s most respected journalists took a buy-out when it was offered, probably because they could see the writing on the wall. The world they operated in has changed irrevocably. Fewer Canadians start their day with a broadsheet and coffee anymore. More and more readers access their news from news-aggregation sites such as Google News that draws together sources – wire services, video, infographics and social media links – from around the world. And they get it instantaneously on smart phones and tablets at home and at the office. Canadian businesses and organizations have hit the pause button and are considering what all this means for their own media…

Photo : Susan Wright June 27, 2016

Craig Adams - Titus-Craig Adams

My “Man Drawer” and Me - Sponsored Content We all have one… that place in the house or garage that becomes the container of last refuge (or even refuse) for those items we should file in the right place, but we haven’t quite gotten around to doing that yet. It could contain an old credit card, some bits of string, important mementoes or other innumerable items that you just don’t know what to do with but somehow can’t throw away. For me, it’s my ‘Man Drawer’—my little haven in the kitchen that much to my wife’s annoyance I don’t allow her to touch, let alone clean-up! I’m not quite sure what’s in it, what’s valuable, what I really should throw away or what I should put in a safer location. It just sits there as the place I stuff things into, and the first place I look when I can’t find something I need. In my experience, legacy data at most medium and large organizations is very much like my Man Drawer. The CIO knows that his team manages a lot of information, both structured and unstructured, which is spread across the organization’s storage infrastructure in different repositories such as file stores, email, and applications. It may even be stored up in the Cloud. But there is no way, other than a manual audit by the business, to discover and understand what the data is, what should be kept, what’s junk, and most importantly, what should be protected because it’s critical for compliance, audit, or operational reasons. But there is a…

Photo : Craig Adams June 06, 2016

Kyle Stout - Nelligan O'Brien Payne - Kyle Stout

When Is Late Too Late? Supreme Court of Canada Clarifies Limits on Courts’ Jurisdiction to Backdate Orders - Sponsored Article On December 4, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada released its highly anticipated decision in a trilogy of shareholder class actions under the secondary market liability provisions of the Ontario Securities Act – Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce v Green (“Green”), Silver v Imax Corporation (“Imax”), and Trustees of the Millwright Regional Council of Ontario Pension Trust Fund v Celestica Inc. (“Celestica”) – reported as Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce v Green (“CIBC v Green”). At issue in each of the trilogy cases was whether the limitation period for commencing a statutory claim for secondary market misrepresentation under the Ontario Securities Act (the “OSA”) is suspended: (a) once the representative plaintiff files a statement of claim pleading an intention to seek leave to commence the statutory claim; or (b) only once leave has been granted.  The Supreme Court’s finding that the clock did not stop running on the limitation period under Section 138.14 of the OSA until leave was actually granted, is unlikely to have any major impact on future securities class actions cases in Ontario, given the 2014 amendments to the OSA, which provide that the limitation period is suspended when a motion for leave to commence the statutory claim is filed with the court.  More interesting, for those law or Latin geeks among the OBJ readership, are the Court’s findings regarding the courts’ jurisdiction to issue orders nunc pro tunc. Limits on the Nunc Pro Tunc Doctrine Nunc pro tunc, the Latin phrase “now for then” refers to the power of…

Photo : Kyle Stout May 16, 2016