Bank of Canada

The Canadian economy stayed flat in May, with real gross domestic product showing neither growth nor contraction after a 0.3 per cent expansion in April.
TD chief economist Beata Caranci said inflation today might feel especially challenging because Canadians have been shielded from inflation volatility for decades.
The increase in the consumer price index for the month was largely due to gasoline prices, which shot up by more than 50 per cent from with a year ago.
The association revealed Friday that June home sales amounted to 48,176, a 24 per cent drop from 63,280 during the same month last year.
As Canadians face a double whammy of skyrocketing inflation and the largest interest rate hike seen in 24 years, one expert is warning that prices won't be coming down anytime soon.
The Bank of Canada signaled a more aggressive approach to bringing skyrocketing inflation back under control as it announced the largest single rate increase since August 1998.
Firm says it now expects the aggregate price of a home in Ottawa will be up 10 per cent in the fourth quarter of 2022 compared with a year earlier, down from its previous forecast of 13 per cent.
In its new two-year outlook, the think tank says it is not expecting an economic contraction in Canada, but the risks are creeping up.
The Bank of Canada raised its key interest rate by half a percentage point on June 1, bringing it to 1.5 per cent. Since then, it has signalled a willingness to move in a more aggressive direction.
That marks the lowest rate in at least two decades and comes even as the local economy's job-creation engine stalled last month.